February Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone

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February Homesteading Chores

These July homesteading chores are intended as a general guideline. Most homesteaders will need to adjust their activities according to their local climate and conditions. For information tailored to your area, consult your local extension office.

Find Your Zone… Click on the link to see your average first and last frost dates.

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USDA Zone 1

Average low temperatures:
  • -60 to -55F in zone 1a
  • -55 to -50F in zone 1b

Barn Chores

  • Keep livestock well fed and protected from wind and cold
  • Check for signs of hypothermia and frostbite on livestock
  • Water should be kept ice-free with proper heaters
  • Make sure barn is ventilated (but draft free) to prevent disease
  • Give poultry corn or sunflower seed for extra calories
  • Poultry may lay eggs with 14 hours of artificial light a day in their coop
  • Gather eggs often to prevent freezing
  • Keep bedding clean and dry

Garden Chores

  • Order gardening catalogs and list seeds needed
  • Plan garden beds (be sure to rotate crops)
  • Clean and oil tools if you didn’t do so in autumn
  • Grow herbs and houseplants under lights indoors
  • Check houseplants for scale and mites, treat if necessary
  • Houseplants do not need fertilizer until daylight hours increase
February Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone - The New Homesteader's Almanac

USDA Zone 2

Average Low Temperatures:
  • -50 to -45F in zone 2a
  • -45 to -30F in zone 2b

Barn Chores

  • Keep livestock well fed and protected from wind and cold
  • Check for signs of hypothermia and frostbite on livestock
  • Water should be kept ice-free with proper heaters
  • Make sure barn is ventilated (but draft free) to prevent disease
  • Give poultry corn or sunflower seed for extra calories
  • Poultry may lay eggs with 14 hours of artificial light a day in their coop
  • Gather eggs often to prevent freezing
  • Keep bedding clean and dry

Garden Chores

  • Order gardening catalogs
  • Plan garden beds (be sure to rotate crops)
  • List seed varieties to order
  • Check fruit-bearing trees and shrubs for damage from wildlife
  • Clean and oil tools if you didn’t do so in autumn
  • Grow herbs and houseplants under lights indoors
  • Check houseplants for scale and mites, treat if necessary
  • Houseplants do not need fertilizer until daylight hours increase
February Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone - The New Homesteader's Almanac

USDA Zone 3

Average Low Temperatures:
  • -40 to -35F in zone 3a
  • -35 to -30F in zone 3b

Barn Chores

  • Keep livestock well fed and protected from wind and cold
  • Check for signs of hypothermia and frostbite on livestock
  • Water should be kept ice-free with proper heaters
  • Make sure barn is ventilated (but draft free) to prevent disease
  • Give poultry corn or sunflower seed in the evening to keep them warm
  • Poultry may lay eggs with 14 hours of artificial light a day in their coop
  • Gather eggs often to prevent freezing
  • Keep bedding clean and dry
  • Check fence lines for needed repairs and signs of predators

Garden Chores

  • Order vegetable, fruit, and flower seeds
  • Plan garden beds (be sure to rotate crops)
  • Clean up seed starting area and list supplies needed
  • Check fruit-bearing trees and shrubs for damage from wildlife
  • Clean and oil tools if you didn’t do so in autumn
  • Grow herbs and houseplants under lights indoors
  • Check houseplants for scale and mites, treat if necessary
  • Houseplants may need a little fertilizer
February Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone - The New Homesteader's Almanac

USDA Zone 4

Average Low Temperatures:
  • -30 to -25F in zone 4a
  • -25 to -20F in zone 4b

Barn Chores

  • Keep livestock well fed and protected from wind and cold
  • Check for signs of hypothermia and frostbite on livestock
  • Water should be kept ice-free with proper heaters
  • Make sure barn is ventilated (but draft free) to prevent disease
  • Give poultry corn or sunflower seed in the evening to keep them warm
  • Poultry may lay eggs with 14 hours of artificial light a day in their coop
  • Gather eggs often to prevent freezing
  • Keep bedding clean and dry
  • Check fence lines for needed repairs and signs of predators
  • Check sugaring equipment for needed repairs, stock up on firewood for boiling sap

Garden Chores

  • Order gardening seeds and supplies
  • Clean your seed starting area
  • Plan garden beds (be sure to rotate crops)
  • Order fruit trees, shrubs, perennials, and annual plants
  • Check fruit-bearing trees and shrubs for damage from wildlife
  • Clean and sharpen pruning tools
  • Clean and oil tools if you didn’t do so in autumn
  • Grow herbs and houseplants in sunny windows or under lights
  • Check houseplants for scale and mites, treat if necessary

 
February Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone - The New Homesteader's Almanac

USDA Zone 5

Average Low Temperatures:
  • -20 to -15F in zone 5a
  • -15 to -10F in zone 5b

Barn Chores

  • Keep livestock well fed and protected from wind and cold
  • Check for signs of frostbite on chicken combs, wattles, and feet
  • Water should be kept ice-free with proper heaters
  • Make sure barn is ventilated (but draft free) to prevent disease
  • Give poultry corn or sunflower seed in the evening to keep them warm
  • Poultry may lay eggs with 14 hours of artificial light a day in their coop
  • Gather eggs often to prevent freezing
  • Keep bedding clean and dry
  • Order hatchery catalogs for spring poultry purchases
  • Check hatching and brooding supplies and order necessary equipment
  • Check fence lines for needed repairs and signs of predators
  • Check sugaring equipment for needed repairs, stock up on firewood for boiling sap

Garden Chores

  • Set up seed starting area
  • Plant seeds of cool-season crops indoors
  • Plant perennial seeds indoors
  • Plan garden beds (be sure to rotate crops)
  • Order dormant fruit trees, shrubs, perennials, and annual plants to order
  • Check fruit-bearing trees and shrubs for damage from wildlife
  • Clean and sharpen pruning tools
  • Prune fruit trees
  • Grow herbs and houseplants in sunny windows or under lights
  • Check houseplants for scale and mites, treat if necessary
February Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone - The New Homesteader's Almanac

USDA Zone 6

Average Low Temperatures:
  • -10 to -5F in zone 6a
  • -55 to 0F in zone 6b

Barn Chores

  • Protect livestock from wind and cold
  • Check for signs of frostbite on chicken combs, wattles, and feet
  • Water should be kept ice-free with proper heaters
  • Make sure barn is ventilated (but draft free) to prevent disease
  • Give poultry corn or sunflower seed in the evening to keep them warm
  • Poultry may lay eggs with 14 hours of artificial light a day in their coop
  • Gather eggs often to prevent freezing
  • Keep bedding clean and dry
  • Place orders for day old poultry in advance for the best selection
  • Clean and organize hatching supplies and brooders
  • Prepare for livestock birthing, clean and check bottles and first aid kit
  • Check fence lines for needed repairs and signs of predators
  • Clean sugaring equipment, stock up on firewood for boiling sap
  • Collect and boil sap on warm days

Garden Chores

  • Order gardening seeds and supplies from seed catalogs
  • Set up seed starting area and purchase potting mix & materials
  • Plant seeds of cool-season crops and spring flowering annuals indoors
  • Plant perennial seeds indoors
  • Direct seed cool-season vegetables in cold frames
  • Plant seeds of slow growing, warm season vegetables indoors
  • Plan garden beds (be sure to rotate crops)
  • Order fruit trees, shrubs, perennials, and annual plants for spring
  • Prune fruit trees and shrubs
  • Clean and sharpen gardening tools
  • Grow herbs and houseplants in sunny windows
  • Increase fertilizer for houseplants slightly
February Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone - The New Homesteader's Almanac

USDA Zone 7

Average Low Temperatures:
  • 0 to 5F in zone 7a
  • 5 to 10F in zone 7b

Barn Chores

  • Make sure barn is ventilated (but draft free) to prevent disease
  • Give poultry corn or sunflower seed in the evening to keep them warm
  • Poultry may lay eggs with 14 hours of artificial light a day in their coop
  • Gather eggs often in freezing temperatures
  • Keep bedding clean and dry
  • Place orders for day old poultry
  • Clean and organize hatching supplies and brooders
  • Prepare for livestock birthing, clean and check bottles and first aid kit
  • Check your fencing for needed repairs and signs of predators
  • Prepare equipment for planting spring crops

Garden Chores

  • Finish ordering gardening seeds and supplies
  • Finish setting up seed starting area
  • Plant seeds of warm-season annual flowers and vegetables under lights indoors
  • Direct seed cool-season crops in cold frames or low tunnels
  • Prepare garden beds
  • Plant dormant fruit trees, shrubs, and perennials
  • Apply dormant oil spray to fruit trees
  • Clean and sharpen gardening tools
  • Grow herbs and houseplants in sunny windows
  • Increase fertilizer for houseplants slightly
February Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone - The New Homesteader's Almanac

USDA Zone 8

Average Low Temperatures:
  • 10 to 15F in zone 8a
  • 15 to 20F in zone 8b

Barn Chores

  • Pasture livestock in good weather
  • Make sure barn is ventilated (but draft free) to prevent disease
  • Give poultry corn or sunflower seed if weather is cold
  • Poultry should lay eggs with 14 hours of artificial light a day in their coop
  • Gather eggs often during freezing temperatures
  • Keep bedding clean and dry
  • Place orders for day old poultry
  • Clean and organize hatching supplies and brooders
  • Hatch fertile poultry eggs in an incubator
  • Prepare for, and assist in, livestock birthing, clean and check bottles and first aid kit
  • Repair fencing and check for signs of predators
  • Prepare equipment for planting spring crops

Garden Chores

  • Prepare garden beds
  • Harvest cool-season greens, such as spinach and kale, from cold frames
  • Direct seed cool-season vegetables in cold frames
  • Plant seeds of warm-season flowers and vegetables indoors under lights
  • Plant dormant fruit trees, shrubs, hardy perennials, and bare root roses
  • Plant evergreens
  • Prune winter blooming trees and shrubs after flowering
  • Spray dormant oil on fruit trees before buds swell
  • Clean and sharpen gardening tools
  • Grow herbs and houseplants in sunny windows
  • Increase fertilizer for houseplants
  • Protect tender plants from frost
February Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone - The New Homesteader's Almanac

USDA Zone 9

Average Low Temperatures:
  • 20 to 25F in zone 9a
  • 25 to 30F in zone 9b

Barn Chores

  • Pasture livestock, protect from inclement weather
  • Make sure barn is ventilated to prevent disease
  • Give poultry corn or sunflower seed in the evening only if weather is cold
  • Poultry should lay eggs with 14 hours of light a day
  • Gather eggs often if temperatures drop
  • Keep bedding clean and dry
  • Place orders for day old poultry
  • Clean and prepare brooders for day-old poultry, order supplies
  • Hatch fertile poultry eggs in an incubator
  • Prepare for, and assist in, livestock birthing, clean and check bottles and first aid kit
  • Repair fencing and check for signs of predators

Garden Chores

  • Harvest cool season crops
  • Direct seed next crop of cool season vegetables
  • Plant heat-loving plants under lights indoors
  • Plant dormant fruit trees, shrubs, and hardy perennials, and frost tolerant annuals
  • Plant citrus trees for your area
  • Clean and sharpen gardening tools
  • Grow herbs and houseplants in sunny windows, move outdoors in nice weather
  • Increase fertilizer for houseplants
  • Protect tender plants if frost threatens
February Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone - The New Homesteader's Almanac

USDA Zone 10

Average Low Temperatures:
  • 30 to 35F in zone 10a
  • 35 to 40F in zone 10b

Barn Chores

  • Pasture livestock
  • Make sure barn is ventilated (but draft free) to prevent disease
  • Poultry should lay eggs with 14 hours of light a day
  • Keep bedding clean and dry
  • Order day old poultry
  • Prepare brooders for day-old poultry orders
  • Hatch fertile poultry eggs in incubators
  • Prepare for, and assist in, livestock birthing, clean and check bottles and first aid kit
  • Repair fencing and check for signs of predators

Garden Chores

  • Harvest cool season crops grown in cold frames
  • Direct seed next crop of cool-season vegetables in garden beds
  • Harden off cool season flower and vegetable seedlings and plant in garden beds
  • Plant heat-loving plants under lights indoors
  • Protect citrus trees from frost
  • Plant citrus trees, fruit trees, shrubs, hardy perennials, and frost tolerant annuals
  • Clean and sharpen gardening tools
  • Grow herbs and houseplants in sunny windows
  • Increase fertilizer for houseplants
Top 30 Tips for Growing & Using Citrus Fruits - The New Homesteader's Almanac

USDA Zone 11

Average Low Temperatures:
  • 40 to 45F for zone 11a
  • 45 to 50F for zone 11b

Barn Chores

  • Pasture livestock
  • Poultry should lay eggs with 14 hours of light a day
  • Keep bedding clean and dry to prevent disease
  • Place orders for day old poultry
  • Prepare brooders for day-old poultry orders
  • Hatch fertile poultry eggs in incubators
  • Prepare for, and assist in, livestock birthing, clean and check bottles and first aid kit
  • Repair fencing and check for signs of predators

Garden Chores

  • Harvest cool season crops
  • Transplant last crop of cool-season vegetables outdoors in cool, shady areas
  • Plant the rest of the heat loving plants under lights indoors
  • Plant citrus, fruit trees, shrubs, and hardy perennials
  • Weed beds
  • Grow herbs and houseplants in sunny windows or on patios
  • Fertilize houseplants
  • Harvest citrus fruits and preserve for offseason
Notes: Within each USDA Zone, there are many different micro-climates and variations in frost free dates, average low temperatures, and average high temperatures. Visit the Interactive USDA Zone Map for the most accurate information about your local conditions.
The information listed here is intended to give a general guideline to appropriate homesteading activities for your area. Each individual using these guidelines must determine if the information is accurate for their conditions.

This site is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for The New Homesteader’s Almanac to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. You will not pay any extra for these products and we earn a small commission to help support this free website.

February Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone - The New Homesteader's Almanac
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Lisa Lombardo

Freelance Writer & Blogger at Tohoca, LLC
Lisa writes in-depth articles about gardening and homesteading topics. She grew up on a farm and has continued learning about horticulture, animal husbandry, and home food preservation ever since. She has earned an Associate of Applied Science in Horticulture and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. She is a self proclaimed gardening freak and crazy chicken lady.

In addition to writing for her own websites, Lisa has contributed articles to The Prepper Project and Homestead.org.

The author lives outside of Chicago with her husband, son, 2 dogs, 1 cat, and a variety of poultry.
Lisa Lombardo
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Spread the love
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About Lisa Lombardo

Lisa writes in-depth articles about gardening and homesteading topics. She grew up on a farm and has continued learning about horticulture, animal husbandry, and home food preservation ever since. She has earned an Associate of Applied Science in Horticulture and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. She is a self proclaimed gardening freak and crazy chicken lady. In addition to writing for her own websites, Lisa has contributed articles to The Prepper Project and Homestead.org. The author lives outside of Chicago with her husband, son, 2 dogs, 1 cat, and a variety of poultry.

26 comments on “February Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone

  1. Addie | Old World New

    I live in zone 8 or 9 in Texas, and I think the temperature is generally higher, but it varies so often that I wouldn’t doubt those averages. I want chieckens one day so this info is great to know!!

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lombardo Post author

      Hi Addie,
      Thanks for the feedback! There is a lot of variation within a zone. The temps actually come from the USDA website and the chores are what I have been able to research.

      I hope you are able to get your chickens someday! Thanks for stopping by!

      Reply
  2. Pamela

    I’m in zone 5b and just getting seeds together and making plans for garden. No farm no animals outside that is! All looks good!
    Although this week we got down to -19 and wind chills -25 !! Great useful info!!

    Reply
  3. Rosie

    I live in France where we don’t use this system. Our coldest winter temps are around 12°C (10°F) although not for too long and not every winter. Summer probably averages around 22°C (72°F) although last summer was much hotter than. The latest we’ve ever had a frost was May 28th but it usually mid April and the earliest we’d had a frost was Sept 28th (thankfully not in the same year) but it is normally mid Oct. Any idea what zone that would put me in?

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lombardo Post author

      Hi Rosie…this sounds similar to zone 8a in the US…but in a mild climate near the ocean, perhaps in Southern California. The zone system is good for narrowing things down, however there is so much variation within a zone, due to latttude, proximity to a large body of water, and micro-climates…that it is difficult to pinpoint.

      Thank you for sharing your climate information. I have been searching for more information about the climate in other countries, but it seems that there isn’t an online resource for very many nations. I hope you have a wonderful spring!

      Reply
      1. Rosie

        Brilliant and thank you – we are very much between a maritime climate to the west which generally wins but a continental climate to the east that sometimes gets to dominate. I would guess we are much wetter than any part of California though and even within Normandy there can be huge variations. I left he coast one day in blazing heat, only to get to us an hour south to find it many degrees cooler and blanketed in fog. We had friends here who live in California and one thing they said they loved was our clouds as they said the sky in LA was either blue and cloud free or grey with monotone clouds. Here we often have wonderful cloud formations.

        Reply
        1. Lisa Lombardo Post author

          Ah, yes…there is so much variation within zones here too! We moved in 2010 to our 1 acre homestead…about 12 miles from where we lived before…and yet, we are considered 1/2 zone warmer. I’m not feeling it today! (It was -9 F here when I got up this morning and we are supposed to go much colder this week.)

          Reply
  4. Jennifer Cook

    I love this! It is slow this time of year but still there is work to be done. I am in zone 6, so in a week or two I will begin some of my seeds. I love when it gets to this time of year I get stir crazy waiting to get started. Thanks so much for this informational guideline!!

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lombardo Post author

      Very happy to share, Jennifer! If you ever have a suggestion to make the list better, please leave a comment! Have fun starting your seeds. 🙂

      Reply
  5. Holly

    Thank you for this extensive list! I am new to homesteading and not fully set up yet, but this is very helpful to me to know what I need to consider and keep in mind for all seasons.

    Reply
  6. Annie Lewellyn

    Living in Zone 9. I love that you split it into zones A and B! Our weather has been so unpredictable the last few years that we kind of have to wing it a bit. However, I garden all year. December and January are a bit tough. We just have to be prepared to cover plants when we do get a freeze, which has been pretty often through December and January lately. Spot on Lisa! Great information!

    Reply
  7. candy

    I am in Zone 5B and this is spot on for most years. The wind is our enemy with all the drifting and blowing snow which you must take into consideration. Even on a sunny warm day the wind can make it much colder. We start planning our seeds in February but start planting our cold items the end of February.

    Reply
  8. Julie

    Love this break down. I am in Zone 8 and will be planting my seeds this weekend. The rest stays on the list this time of year. Thanks!

    Reply
  9. Marla

    Hi Lisa,
    Very informative. I am not a homesteader but I do quite a bit of gardening. A lot of flowers and herbs. I live in zone 6 which I always check when I order bulbs or plants but it changes so much from year to year depending how long old man winter wants to stay around.

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lombardo Post author

      That’s great, Marla! That reminds me, I should have mentioned a bit more about knowing your zone!

      I am hoping winter decides to take an early break this year, lol!

      Reply
  10. Kristi Stone

    Hey, I just did some of this zone 9 stuff! I fixed some fencing just yesterday! We aren’t getting 14 hours of sunlight every day, that’s probably why my girls aren’t doing any laying right now. Does that go for ducks too? It looks like currently, we are getting about 10 hours of sunlight. Thanks for the info! I did not know that.

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lombardo Post author

      Happy to share, Kristi…that’s cool that you are working on this list already!

      Yes, hens take a break from laying when the daylight hours are shorter, since their biological clocks tell them that they wouldn’t be able to raise chicks during the winter. You can put a light on a timer in their coop if you would like to encourage laying. Some people prefer to let their hens take a break for winter…everyone is different!

      Reply
  11. Candy

    Keeping water from freezing is a round clock chores some days. Cleaning sharpening planning garden

    Reply

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