Great Backyard Bird Count Fun!

Spread the love
  • 24
  • 5
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    29
    Shares

Great Backyard Bird Count Fun! Be a part of the Great American Backyard Bird Count...anyone can take part! Here are some fun activities for the whole family, pluse ways you can help birds in your yard!

Great Backyard Bird Count Activities for The Whole Family!

The Great Backyard Bird Count takes place every February and helps give ornithologists the big picture on our wild bird populations. Be a part of the project by taking 15 minutes to observe the bird species in your backyard this weekend. Report your findings to help the National Audobon Society and The Cornell Lab of Ornithology do a bird population study!

Your Practical Guide to Companion Planting

This post contains affiliate links. You will not pay extra for products purchased through those links, but we may earn a small commission from the sale.

Cardinal in winter
Male Cardinal

To Be A Part Of The Great Backyard Bird Count…

Anyone can be a part of the fun! Check out the information at Great Backyard Bird Count for information on how to get started. Their site explains how to participate. They have great photos from last year’s photo contest, too! You can find out about the data collected and learn about different bird species.

Dark eyed junco
Dark Eyed Junco

Check out online identification guides with All About Birds and the Audubon Guide to North American Birds. These free identification guides help identify your backyard birds.

The Great Backyard Bird Count is a great way for anyone to learn more about birds and help scientists get a better idea of changes in our bird populations. Get the whole family involved by including you children or grandchildren too!

Black Capped Chickadee on feeder

How To Help Birds In Your Backyard!

Feeding birds is a great way to start helping our feathered friends! Some things to keep in mind when feeding wild birds:

  • Feed high quality seed to avoid waste
  • Clean feeders often with bleach water to avoid sick birds
  • Place feeders away from domestic poultry pens to avoid sick poultry
  • Feed year round to help nesting and overwintering birds
  • Hang hummingbird and oriole feeders in summer and change nectar often
Hummingbirds love pink and scarlet bee balm.

Planting For The Birds…

Plant trees, shrubs, and flowers that help feed wild birds. Here are some plants that provide food or nesting places:

  • Serviceberry tree
  • Hawthorne
  • Mountain ash
  • Rose of Sharon
  • Holly
  • Honeysuckle
  • Weigela
  • Scarlet Trumpet vine
  • Sunflower
  • Cardinal flower
  • Coral bells
  • Bee balm
  • Butterfly bush

Provide a source of water for birds year round too!

Bohemian Waxwings

Cornell Lab of Ornithology Free Educational Resources

If you are an eductor or a homeschooler, The Cornell Lab of Ornithology website is a great resource. They have K -12 lessons and activities available for different levels of comprehension.

hummingbird feeding on flowers
Female Ruby Throated hummingbird

Curriculum Units & Resources

You can download some of their curriculum units by age level for free! There are kits you may purchase, including an owl pellet kit. If you live somewhere that owls hunt, you might be able to find your own owl pellets to investigate!

They also have free videos, a free ‘Investigating Evidence’ curriculum with Teacher’s Guide, resource and journal pages, and online resources.

The Book Units that go with popular childrens book are also a great resource. Take books out of the library to read with kids, then use the units to work through age appropriate lessons.

Ebird Course and Newsletter for Educators

Another free resource for educators is the free ebird course and newsletter with units for learning and teaching ornithology. There really is a lot available on the Cornell Lab website to learn about birds!

California Jay Bird - Graphics Fairy

Bird Crafts and Printables

Here are some free resources for creating crafts and fun printable images for your budding backyard bird enthusiasts!

The Graphics Fairy has vintage bird images that you may download and print out for free. (There are premium kits available for purchase, but I haven’t used those.) Create your greeting cards or a mini bird book with kids. You can also decorate your lesson plans, calendars, and crafts!

Coloring Ws and Mom Junction have coloring pages geared toward early education.

The Indianapollis Public Library website has free bird books for young children available online. They also have links to bird crafts for preschoolers and early education. And of course you can find a ton of educational bird activities on Pinterest!

Here are Some Fun Videos About Birds for Kids…

This site is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for The New Homesteader’s Almanac to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. You will not pay any extra for these products and we earn a small commission to help support this free website.

Lisa Lombardo
Follow me...

Lisa Lombardo

Freelance Writer & Blogger at Tohoca, LLC
Lisa writes in-depth articles about gardening and homesteading topics. She grew up on a farm and has continued learning about horticulture, animal husbandry, and home food preservation ever since. She has earned an Associate of Applied Science in Horticulture and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. She is a self proclaimed gardening freak and crazy chicken lady.

In addition to writing for her own websites, Lisa has contributed articles to The Prepper Project and Homestead.org.

The author lives outside of Chicago with her husband, son, 2 dogs, 1 cat, and a variety of poultry.
Lisa Lombardo
Follow me...

Latest posts by Lisa Lombardo (see all)


Spread the love
  • 24
  • 5
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    29
    Shares

About Lisa Lombardo

Lisa writes in-depth articles about gardening and homesteading topics. She grew up on a farm and has continued learning about horticulture, animal husbandry, and home food preservation ever since. She has earned an Associate of Applied Science in Horticulture and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. She is a self proclaimed gardening freak and crazy chicken lady. In addition to writing for her own websites, Lisa has contributed articles to The Prepper Project and Homestead.org. The author lives outside of Chicago with her husband, son, 2 dogs, 1 cat, and a variety of poultry.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.