July Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone

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July Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone - The New Homesteader's Almanac

July Homesteading Chores

These homesteading chores are intended as a general guideline. Most homesteaders will need to adjust their activities according to their local climate and conditions. For information tailored to your area, consult your local extension office.

Find Your Zone… Click on the link to see your average first and last frost dates.

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USDA Zone 1

Average Low Temperatures:

  • -60 to -55F in zone 1a
  • -55 to -50F in zone 1b

July Homesteading – Farm Chores

  • Allow livestock out on pasture
  • Incubate fertile eggs or order day-old poultry from a hatchery
  • Move young poultry out to coop when they are ready
  • Put up hay as weather allows
  • Irrigate and cultivate crops as needed
  • Cut, split, and store firewood
  • Work on building projects when the weather allows


July Homesteading – Garden Chores

  • Clean out cold frames and amend the soil for fall crops
  • Start cool-season seedlings indoors early in July and plant by the end of the month for fall harvest
  • Direct seed cool-season crops in the garden around the middle of July
  • Harvest cool-season crops
  • Finish planting potatoes and onions early in July
  • Transplant warm season crops to garden beds when the weather allows
  • Cultivate and irrigate garden crops as needed
  • Water new trees, shrubs, and perennials as needed
  • Preserve the harvest for winter
Swiss chard interplanted with basil and flowers

USDA Zone 2

Average Low Temperatures:

  • -50 to -45F in zone 2a
  • -45 to -30F in zone 2b


July Homesteading – Farm Chores

  • Allow livestock out on pasture
  • Finish moving young poultry to the chicken coop if you haven’t done so
  • Put up hay as weather allows
  • Irrigate and cultivate crops as needed
  • Cut, split, and store firewood
  • Work on building projects when the weather allows


July Homesteading – Garden Chores

  • Clean out cold frames and amend the soil
  • Start cool-season seedlings indoors in the middle of July for fall harvest
  • Harvest cool-season crops
  • Finish planting potatoes and onions
  • Finish transplanting warm season crops to garden beds
  • Cultivate and irrigate garden crops as needed
  • Water new trees, shrubs, and perennials as needed
  • Preserve the harvest for winter

USDA Zone 3

Average Low Temperatures:

  • -40 to -35F in zone 3a
  • -35 to -30F in zone 3b


July Homesteading – Farm Chores

  • Allow livestock out on pasture
  • Provide livestock with shade and extra water in hot weather
  • Put up hay as weather allows
  • Irrigate and cultivate crops as needed
  • Check field crops for insect damage, treat as necessary
  • Cut, split, and store firewood
  • Work on building projects when the weather allows


July Homesteading – Garden Chores

  • Clean out cold frames and amend the soil
  • Start cool-season seedlings indoors early in July and plant by the end of the month for fall harvest
  • Direct seed cool-season crops in the garden around the middle of July
  • Tend and harvest warm-season vegetables
  • Preserve the harvest
  • Mulch garden crops, trees, shrubs, perennials, and annuals to prevent moisture loss from soil
  • Cultivate and irrigate garden crops as needed
  • Water newly planted trees, shrubs, and perennials as needed
  • Preserve the harvest
  • Grow herbs and houseplants outdoors
heat tolerant chicken breeds - Lakenvelds

USDA Zone 4

Average Low Temperatures:

  • -30 to -25F in zone 4a
  • -25 to -20F in zone 4b


July Homesteading – Farm Chores

  • Allow livestock out on pasture
  • Provide livestock with shade and extra water in hot weather
  • Poultry need shade and extra water in hot weather to continue laying eggs
  • Check livestock often for signs of heat distress
  • Check field crops for insect damage, treat as necessary
  • Put up hay as weather allows
  • Irrigate and cultivate crops as needed
  • Cut, split, and store firewood
  • Work on building projects when the weather allows


July Homesteading – Garden Chores

  • Clean out cold frames and amend the soil
  • Plant cool season crops indoors in the middle of July for transplanting to the garden for fall harvest
  • Direct seed cool-season crops by the end of July in a shady spot of the garden
  • Tend and harvest warm-season vegetables
  • Preserve the harvest
  • Mulch garden crops, trees, shrubs, perennials, and annuals to prevent moisture loss from soil
  • Cultivate and irrigate garden crops as needed
  • Water newly planted trees, shrubs, and perennials as needed
  • Preserve the harvest
  • Grow herbs and houseplants outdoors in a shady spot

USDA Zone 5

Average Low Temperatures:

  • -20 to -15F in zone 5a
  • -15 to -10F in zone 5b


July Homesteading – Farm Chores

  • Allow livestock out on pasture
  • Provide livestock with shade and extra water in hot weather
  • Poultry need shade and extra water in hot weather to continue laying eggs
  • Check livestock often for signs of heat distress
  • Put up hay as weather allows
  • Harvest oat crop
  • Irrigate and cultivate crops as needed
  • Check field crops for insect damage, treat as necessary
  • Cut, split, and store firewood
  • Work on building projects when the weather allows


July Homesteading – Garden Chores

  • Clean out cold frames and amend the soil
  • Begin planting cool season crops indoors for transplanting to the garden for fall harvest
  • Direct seed cool-season crops in a shady spot of the garden toward the end of July
  • Tend and harvest warm-season vegetables
  • Preserve the harvest
  • Mulch garden crops, trees, shrubs, perennials, and annuals to prevent moisture loss from soil
  • Cultivate and irrigate garden crops as needed
  • Water newly planted trees, shrubs, and perennials as needed
  • Grow herbs and houseplants outdoors in a shady spot

USDA Zone 6

Average Low Temperatures:

  • -10 to -5F in zone 6a
  • -5 to 0F in zone 6b


July Homesteading – Farm Chores

  • Pasture livestock
  • Provide livestock with shade and extra water in hot weather
  • Poultry need shade and extra water in hot weather to continue laying eggs
  • Check livestock often for signs of heat distress
  • Put up hay as weather allows
  • Harvest oats and winter wheat if you haven’t already done so
  • Irrigate and cultivate crops as needed
  • Check field crops for insect damage, treat as necessary
  • Cut, split, and store firewood
  • Work on building projects when the weather allows


July Homesteading – Garden Chores

  • Clean out cold frames and amend the soil
  • Plan fall garden and order seeds for cool season crops if you haven’t done so
  • Tend and harvest warm-season vegetables
  • Preserve the harvest
  • Mulch garden crops, trees, shrubs, perennials, and annuals to prevent moisture loss from soil
  • Cultivate and irrigate garden crops as needed
  • Water newly planted trees, shrubs, and perennials as needed
  • Grow herbs and houseplants outdoors in a shady spot

USDA Zone 7

Average Low Temperatures:

  • 0 to 5F in zone 7a
  • 5 to 10F in zone 7b


July Homesteading – Farm Chores

  • Pasture livestock
  • Provide livestock with shade and extra water in hot weather
  • Poultry need shade and extra water in hot weather to continue laying eggs
  • Check livestock often for signs of heat distress
  • Put up hay as weather allows
  • Harvest oat crop and winter wheat if you haven’t done so
  • Irrigate and cultivate crops as needed
  • Check field crops for insect damage, treat as necessary
  • Cut, split, and store firewood
  • Work on building projects when the weather allows

July Homesteading – Garden Chores

  • Clean out cold frames and amend the soil
  • Plan fall garden and order seeds for cool season crops
  • Tend and harvest warm-season vegetables
  • Preserve the harvest
  • Mulch garden crops, trees, shrubs, perennials, and annuals to prevent moisture loss from soil
  • Cultivate and irrigate garden crops as needed
  • Water newly planted trees, shrubs, and perennials as needed
  • Preserve the harvest
  • Grow herbs and houseplants outdoors in a shady spot

USDA Zone 8

Average Low Temperatures:

  • 10 to 15F in zone 8a
  • 15 to 20F in zone 8b


July Homesteading – Farm Chores

  • Pasture livestock
  • Provide livestock with shade and extra water in hot weather
  • Poultry need shade and extra water in hot weather to continue laying eggs
  • Check livestock often for signs of heat distress
  • Put up hay as weather allows
  • Irrigate and cultivate crops as needed
  • Check field crops for insect damage, treat as necessary
  • Cut, split, and store firewood
  • Work on building projects when the weather allows


July Homesteading – Garden Chores

  • Plan fall garden and order seeds for cool season crops
  • Tend and harvest warm-season vegetables
  • Preserve the harvest
  • Water newly planted fruit trees, shrubs, hardy perennials, and roses
  • Provide extra water for all crops in drought
  • Mulch plants to prevent moisture loss from soil
  • Grow herbs and houseplants in a shady spot outdoors

USDA Zone 9

Average Low Temperatures:

  • 20 to 25F in zone 9a
  • 25 to 30F in zone 9b


July Homesteading – Farm Chores

  • Provide livestock with shade and extra water in hot weather
  • Poultry need shade and extra water in hot weather to continue laying eggs
  • Check livestock often for signs of heat distress
  • Cultivate and irrigate field crops as needed
  • Check field crops for insect damage, treat as necessary


July Homesteading – Garden Chores

  • Begin planning your fall garden
  • Tend and harvest warm-season vegetables
  • Preserve the harvest
  • Water newly planted fruit trees, shrubs, hardy perennials, and roses
  • Provide extra water for all crops in drought
  • Mulch plants to prevent moisture loss from soil
  • Grow herbs and houseplants in a shady spot outdoors
  • Watch for signs of disease and pests in fruit, vegetable, and field crops and treat when needed

USDA Zone 10

Average Low Temperatures:

  • 30 to 35F in zone 10a
  • 35 to 40F in zone 10b


July Homesteading – Farm Chores

  • Provide livestock with shade and extra water in hot weather
  • Poultry need shade and extra water in hot weather to continue laying eggs
  • Check livestock often for signs of heat distress
  • Cultivate and irrigate field crops as needed
  • Check field crops for insect damage, treat as necessary


July Homesteading – Garden Chores

  • Begin planning your fall garden
  • Tend and harvest warm-season vegetables
  • Preserve the harvest
  • Water newly planted fruit trees, shrubs, hardy perennials, and roses
  • Provide extra water for all crops in drought
  • Protect crops with shade cloth when needed
  • Check citrus trees for pests
  • Water citrus trees, fruit trees, shrubs, hardy perennials, and vegetable garden as needed
  • Move herbs and houseplants to shady spots and water often in the heat or move indoors

USDA Zone 11

Average Low Temperatures:

  • 40 to 45F for zone 11a
  • 45 to 50F for zone 11b


July Homesteading – Farm Chores

  • Provide livestock with shade and extra water in hot weather
  • Poultry need shade and extra water in hot weather to continue laying eggs
  • Check livestock often for signs of heat distress
  • Cultivate and irrigate field crops as needed
  • Check field crops for insect damage, treat as necessary


July Homesteading – Garden Chores

  • Begin planning your fall garden
  • Harvest vegetables and preserve
  • Water and weed herbs, vegetables and flowers in garden beds
  • Water newly planted mangoes, avocados, papayas as needed
  • Water, weed and mulch beds
  • Check citrus trees for pests
  • Grow herbs and houseplants in shade and water often in drought, or move indoors
  • Check for pests and hand pick or spray as needed

Notes: Within each USDA Zone, there are many different micro-climates and variations in frost free dates, average low temperatures, and average high temperatures. Visit the Interactive USDA Zone Map for the most accurate information about your local conditions.

The information listed here is intended to give a general guideline to appropriate homesteading activities for your area. Each individual using these guidelines must determine if the information is accurate for their conditions.

 

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July Homesteading Chores by USDA Zone - The New Homesteader's Almanac

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